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    Limited collection boots AW19

    Presenting capsule collection Atelier by Vagabond interpreted by photographer Annie Collinge. This collection of limited boots is inspired by our own archives from the 1990’s and available in seven different styles. Atelier by Vagabond uses contemporary silhouettes and mixes it with carefully selected materials to create a long-lasting product in terms of style and sustainability. Details include the sporty 90’s heel, kitten heels, pony hair and premium materials. Exclusively available in selected Vagabond stores, with selected retailers and on vagabond.com.

    Presented by artist Annie Collinge

    To celebrate the Atelier by Vagabond AW19 Collection, photographer Annie Collinge interpret the collection in a series of images. We spoke to the artist about the state of fashion photography and what she thinks makes a good image. As an artist, Collinge is regularly commissioned by editorial clients like Vice, Dazed & confused and Vouge.

    Annie Collinge started her career assisting photographers at the age of 17 and continued with degrees from Brighton University and Central Saint Martins. Her images often incorporate eerie and childlike elements twisted with a playful take on scale and perspective.

    She launched her first major project Five Inches of Limbo in 2012, featuring pictures of junk store dolls alongside people she found to resemble them. The photos became, self-published with Margaret Atwood’s poem Five Poems for Dolls from which the project takes its title. This helped establish her signature aesthetic, which has been described as “sad and sweet”. Today, Collinge is regularly commissioned by editorial, clients like Vice, Dazed and Vogue while collaborating with artists like Rottingdean Bazaar and Julie Verhoeven.


    "I think fashion images are having a great moment currently, social media has taken the power away from the gate keepers like magazines."


    The range of your clients suggest your work moves between the realms of fine art, commercial and fashion. What draws you into fashion, specifically?

    I think fashion images have the potential to be such a creative medium, as you can tell a story and control your environment. It’s always strange when people just photograph good-looking people in a studio. To me, photographs need to have a mystery to them to draw people in and make them wonder what is or has been happening. I think fashion images are having a great moment currently, social media has taken the power away from the gate keepers like magazines. So now, really interesting people who might never have been given a chance are finding their way into the industry.


    How did you create the images for Atelier by Vagabond?

    I wanted to bring the shoes to life, and just make off-key images. I received the samples and played around with shapes, colors and then bought all kind of props from hardware stores and charity shops near my studio . In the end, I used printouts of my own hands that were rephotographed and mixed with everyday household objects. I didn’t want these to look like they were shot in a studio, I wanted to make them unusual but believable scenes. I’m happy that I wasn’t put under pressure to make them too much like an advert.

    Annie Collinge started her career assisting photographers at the age of 17 and continued with degrees from Brighton University and Central Saint Martins. Her images often incorporate eerie and childlike elements twisted with a playful take on scale and perspective.

    She launched her first major project Five Inches of Limbo in 2012, featuring pictures of junk store dolls alongside people she found to resemble them. The photos became, self-published with Margaret Atwood’s poem Five Poems for Dolls from which the project takes its title. This helped establish her signature aesthetic, which has been described as “sad and sweet”. Today, Collinge is regularly commissioned by editorial, clients like Vice, Dazed and Vogue while collaborating with artists like Rottingdean Bazaar and Julie Verhoeven.


    "I think fashion images are having a great moment currently, social media has taken the power away from the gate keepers like magazines."


    The range of your clients suggest your work moves between the realms of fine art, commercial and fashion. What draws you into fashion, specifically?

    I think fashion images have the potential to be such a creative medium, as you can tell a story and control your environment. It’s always strange when people just photograph good-looking people in a studio. To me, photographs need to have a mystery to them to draw people in and make them wonder what is or has been happening. I think fashion images are having a great moment currently, social media has taken the power away from the gate keepers like magazines. So now, really interesting people who might never have been given a chance are finding their way into the industry.


    How did you create the images for Atelier by Vagabond?

    I wanted to bring the shoes to life, and just make off-key images. I received the samples and played around with shapes, colors and then bought all kind of props from hardware stores and charity shops near my studio . In the end, I used printouts of my own hands that were rephotographed and mixed with everyday household objects. I didn’t want these to look like they were shot in a studio, I wanted to make them unusual but believable scenes. I’m happy that I wasn’t put under pressure to make them too much like an advert.

    You use a lot of props in your work, what draws you to them?

    I like things that are strange without being knowing they are strange. I get basically all my inspiration from going to flea markets or charity shops. An everyday object can spark off an idea for no apparent reason. I like starting with an object and then working out how I can add a human element to it, in this case it’s the cutouts.


    How do you as an artist feel about Instagram? Do you think your photos should be shared freely, or do they need contexts that allows more reflection?

    I love Instagram; it has allowed me to share the way I see the world with others and see how they experience theirs. I’ve reached out to other creatives and we have become constant collaborators which has been amazingly fun and refreshing. I’m happy when my images are shared freely as they reach new audiences that don’t necessarily look at fashion magazines or go to galleries, they are now viewed in a more general way and appreciated for just being good or bad content.

    You use a lot of props in your work, what draws you to them?

    I like things that are strange without being knowing they are strange. I get basically all my inspiration from going to flea markets or charity shops. An everyday object can spark off an idea for no apparent reason. I like starting with an object and then working out how I can add a human element to it, in this case it’s the cutouts.


    How do you as an artist feel about Instagram? Do you think your photos should be shared freely, or do they need contexts that allows more reflection?

    I love Instagram; it has allowed me to share the way I see the world with others and see how they experience theirs. I’ve reached out to other creatives and we have become constant collaborators which has been amazingly fun and refreshing. I’m happy when my images are shared freely as they reach new audiences that don’t necessarily look at fashion magazines or go to galleries, they are now viewed in a more general way and appreciated for just being good or bad content.

    This seven-piece collection is available from September the 25th in selected Vagabond flagship stores in Stockholm (Kungsgatan 33), Gothenburg (Kungsgatan 45), Copenhagen (Kronprinsensgade 12), Berlin (Münzstrasse 18) and Moscow (Khodinskiy Blv), and with selected retailers Need Supply (online and in store – 3100 W Cary St, Richmond, VA US), Selfridges (400 Oxford Street, London), Vitrin (City Concorde, 80 Route de Longwy, Bertange, Luxembourg) and Görtz (Hamburg, Berlin, Frankfurt, München, Stuttgart).